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Author Topic: Are privately run mail services seeing a fraction of hope?  (Read 6121 times)
Anarcho/Infowarrior
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« on: September 05, 2011, 11:23:51 PM »

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/postal-service-warns-it-could-lose-10-billion-this-year/2011/09/05/gIQAQWEw4J_story.html

 Government run, statist style mail is in a heap of trouble. With the dire economic depression and collapse sweeping the conscience of the Amerikan collective, a government institution that most people take for granted (and a more than likely ignorant toward) is beginning to slowly crumble. Though our great overlords will most likely start to scream that we need to have more of our money stolen in order to save it, those within the agora should be asking the follow: "Are we ready for a little competition in the business of mail"?

 As most in the anarcho-capitalist march may already know, private run mail services have been attempted in the so-called land of the free. Lysander Spooner, one of America's first great anarchist philosophers, attempted to compete with the government with his own mail service, but was quickly kicked out of business by the Deadstar. Sadly, know one knows how good he did or how many customers he was able to cater to with his business. Perhaps it's time for another Spooner to come forth.

 If a private mail service was to manifest itself, what would you expect from it? How would you want to see things run? What type of benefits would you enjoy obtaining?

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Seth King
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« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2011, 11:28:37 PM »

I'd love to see an agorist 1st class mail establishment pop up. Sure, Fed Ex and UPS are nice, but they're still statist. Hell, just setting up a UPS address requires two forms of government ID.
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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2011, 01:26:56 PM »

Check out what they are doing in Poland, this is awesome:  http://absurdypolskie.blox.pl/html
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« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2011, 06:39:00 AM »

That is hilarious what the Poles are doing =).  Bravo!


I had an idea a few months back.  Peer-to-Peer Anonymous market driven postage.

People are always on the go, heading to work, the grocery store, school, vacations, etc.  What if you could also carry postage since you are already heading out?  Here is how it could work:
You create a piece of mail, and attach a tracking RFID or a barcode to the package.  You log onto a site, enter the RFID number or barcode, the destination, when you would like it to get there, and how much you'll pay for various delivery times as computed by figuring in the market prices of all the transport nodes between destinations.  You'll also probably get a little postage insurance, for perhaps a few cents more to cover the potential of theft, tampering, accidents etc.

You drop it off at a nearby kiosk and the tracking network is updated. 

Other people, who are signed up and insured as mail carriers, will stop by the kiosk while going about their daily routines, prompted by their mobile phones that mail is available to be moved to where they are heading. So, a carrier walks up to a kiosk and authenticates and it spits out the mail that is heading in the general direction or route they are heading in.  They pick up the letters or packages and take them to the next node.

The carriers have to bid against each other through price, reliability, security, reputation, and logistical efficiency (the system will try and choose the fewest jumps that have the lowest delay and the lowest priced carriers with the best reputation and so forth).

If certain nodes get large enough, or have enough throughput, local businesses can create additional nodes so that your local Starbucks at the mall has a mail exchange.  If the mail doesn't move fast enough, rates go up, and other businesses can add additional exchanges.  Furthermore, heavy routes will naturally attract specialist carriers; entrepreneurs who specialize in mail transport between popular nodes.

I think you guys get the drift.
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« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2011, 01:07:38 PM »

That is hilarious what the Poles are doing =).  Bravo!


I had an idea a few months back.  Peer-to-Peer Anonymous market driven postage.

People are always on the go, heading to work, the grocery store, school, vacations, etc.  What if you could also carry postage since you are already heading out?  Here is how it could work:
You create a piece of mail, and attach a tracking RFID or a barcode to the package.  You log onto a site, enter the RFID number or barcode, the destination, when you would like it to get there, and how much you'll pay for various delivery times as computed by figuring in the market prices of all the transport nodes between destinations.  You'll also probably get a little postage insurance, for perhaps a few cents more to cover the potential of theft, tampering, accidents etc.

You drop it off at a nearby kiosk and the tracking network is updated. 

Other people, who are signed up and insured as mail carriers, will stop by the kiosk while going about their daily routines, prompted by their mobile phones that mail is available to be moved to where they are heading. So, a carrier walks up to a kiosk and authenticates and it spits out the mail that is heading in the general direction or route they are heading in.  They pick up the letters or packages and take them to the next node.

The carriers have to bid against each other through price, reliability, security, reputation, and logistical efficiency (the system will try and choose the fewest jumps that have the lowest delay and the lowest priced carriers with the best reputation and so forth).

If certain nodes get large enough, or have enough throughput, local businesses can create additional nodes so that your local Starbucks at the mall has a mail exchange.  If the mail doesn't move fast enough, rates go up, and other businesses can add additional exchanges.  Furthermore, heavy routes will naturally attract specialist carriers; entrepreneurs who specialize in mail transport between popular nodes.

I think you guys get the drift.

Something like that definitely sounds doable. The only problem right now is the lack of demand for such service. But I suppose things like that could take off in places like The Shire. Plus you have to find people willing to take the risk of driving illegal stuff cross country. Doable, for sure.
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« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2011, 11:59:23 PM »

Hmm...I think it's a good idea. As far as people being afraid to drive illegal things cross country I think that's a non-obstacle. If you assume there is still a legal monopoly with the usps, then it's all illegal. If you assume the postal service is dead, then the drivers can legitimately claim to have no idea what's in the packages, just like deliveries now.
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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2011, 03:45:53 PM »

The following conversation takes place at a federal prison after I was convicted and punished for my crime against humanity:

Serial killer: I killed 30 people and kept their heads in my white Ford Econoline van as decorations.
Me: I delivered mail -sniff-
Serial killer: Welcome to the criminal brotherhood
Me: What's that bell?
Serial killer: Shower time...
Me:  Embarrassed  Shocked

Back to reality... I believe first class mail is becoming obsolete, so the USPS will become irrelevant anyway.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2011, 03:48:49 PM by Linux » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2011, 12:12:10 PM »

I'd love to see an agorist 1st class mail establishment pop up. Sure, Fed Ex and UPS are nice, but they're still statist. Hell, just setting up a UPS address requires two forms of government ID.

I've never dealt with UPS, but I never had statist requirements from FedEx.  I've never shown them ID for sending or receiving. 

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyAhx7P_Gfk" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyAhx7P_Gfk</a>

That link about the Poland postal service reminded me of what happened with the USPS back when they started doing air mail.  The pilots use to mail bricks to themselves because they made money hauling more weight.  It went on for years.
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