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Author Topic: Pretty cool homesteading video  (Read 4216 times)
Seth King
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« on: May 02, 2014, 03:07:12 PM »

http://vimeo.com/63333459

I'm sure there are tons of videos like this out on the web.

I thought this was pretty cool and would like to get involved in these sorts of things. Unfortunately, I am a total noob. I'm hoping that as the FSP grows there will be more people that have these skills and can share them with others. I'm not interested in homesteading because of climate change. I'm eager to do it because I love the idea of food and heat independence. Anywho, I could go on and on but maybe I'll save my experiences and thoughts for a blog post in the future.

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When are you moving to New Hampshire?
Syock
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« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2014, 04:11:54 PM »

I've seen this guy before.  Unfortunately most of what you will find on this topic is disingenuous if you are interested in food independence.  They will grow plenty of apples and veggies, but be lacking on what tends to really compose the bulk of the average persons diet.  They will be lacking the wheat or rice and meat that most people really live on.  This guy actually gets people to pay him, to come to his place, and plant his rice for him.  It works for him since people consider it learning, but sooner or later people will figure out how to grow rice without paying to do it for him.  

I also wish I could smack people whenever they say "free" in regards to energy.  He just doesn't recognize that the energy is lost due to inefficient design of the stove he likes so much.  

Edit:

I hate to be all negative on this topic, as it is a concept I like quite a bit.  I just take issue with some of the people involved. 


This guy, Shepard, is doing it the most effective way I have seen.  He took it to a big scale, but the basic concept could be toned down to an individual home. 

He is growing nut trees that can act as the base food for people like wheat or rice, and also growing large animals on the same land.  That is food independence. 
« Last Edit: May 02, 2014, 04:20:31 PM by Syock » Logged

Seth King
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« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2014, 05:07:21 PM »

I think he means "free" as in he didn't have to hand over a wad of cash to the heating oil company to heat his home and water. He merely had to put the labor in to procure the firewood and light and maintain the stove.
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When are you moving to New Hampshire?
Syock
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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2014, 07:15:02 PM »

I think he means "free" as in he didn't have to hand over a wad of cash to the heating oil company to heat his home and water. He merely had to put the labor in to procure the firewood and light and maintain the stove.

Yes, I understand that.  People use that logic and think they have perpetual motion machines though.  It is just failed logic that gets really bad when you apply it widely.  You should see it applied to econ too...
« Last Edit: May 02, 2014, 07:17:23 PM by Syock » Logged

Agrarian_Agorist
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« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2014, 07:30:54 PM »

http://vimeo.com/63333459

I'm sure there are tons of videos like this out on the web.

I thought this was pretty cool and would like to get involved in these sorts of things. Unfortunately, I am a total noob. I'm hoping that as the FSP grows there will be more people that have these skills and can share them with others. I'm not interested in homesteading because of climate change. I'm eager to do it because I love the idea of food and heat independence. Anywho, I could go on and on but maybe I'll save my experiences and thoughts for a blog post in the future.



I think that guy is a vegetarian, and therefore he doesn't need the meat.  If you want something like that it is beneficial to have at least one female goat, some chickens, and for lean red meat rabbits are great.  Duck are also useful, however, I've never eaten a duck egg, and the ducks which I've eaten are very greasy/fatty.  I'm not sure if the fat can be used like lard or maybe for candles or such.

As far as heating, while he uses a compost pile to heat his green house, there is a better way if one is starting from scratch.  Some people call it geothermal, others complain saying that it is not the proper term; but either way it uses the earth to heat either air or water to heat a building. 

How it works: Between 6 feet and lower depending on the location of the property, the earth stays about 70 to 80 degrees all year round.  This temperature differential is used to heat the water or air, and then the air or water is used to heat the local environment.

Just some thoughts for consideration for those who may want to try to do something like homesteading/permaculture/survival retreat.
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Syock
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« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2014, 07:49:22 PM »

I think that guy is a vegetarian, and therefore he doesn't need the meat. 

Perhaps, but then he still needs the veggies.  Even they eat rice, beans, wheat, corn or some alternative to the staple diet.  He doesn't actually do the labor for planting those crops.  He isn't really food independent, which means unless you want to more or less abuse ignorance that his system isn't easily repeatable.  That's all I was getting at. 

How it works: Between 6 feet and lower depending on the location of the property, the earth stays about 70 to 80 degrees all year round.  This temperature differential is used to heat the water or air, and then the air or water is used to heat the local environment.

I believe the natural constant temperature is about 45 F, at 20 feet deep.  Above that it varies with the season/location.  Deserts are good at it as they have very spiky temperature swings and the thermal mass can hold over for the next day.  Usually the geothermal systems are used for preheating or road thawing, not full heating.  Places that deep freeze still benefit of course, but to not require secondary heating, they need either something like passive annual heat storage, or natural geothermal activity such as hot springs. 
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Agrarian_Agorist
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« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2014, 08:01:31 PM »

I think that guy is a vegetarian, and therefore he doesn't need the meat. 

Perhaps, but then he still needs the veggies.  Even they eat rice, beans, wheat, corn or some alternative to the staple diet.  He doesn't actually do the labor for planting those crops.  He isn't really food independent, which means unless you want to more or less abuse ignorance that his system isn't easily repeatable.  That's all I was getting at. 

How it works: Between 6 feet and lower depending on the location of the property, the earth stays about 70 to 80 degrees all year round.  This temperature differential is used to heat the water or air, and then the air or water is used to heat the local environment.

I believe the natural constant temperature is about 45 F, at 20 feet deep.  Above that it varies with the season/location.  Deserts are good at it as they have very spiky temperature swings and the thermal mass can hold over for the next day.  Usually the geothermal systems are used for preheating or road thawing, not full heating.  Places that deep freeze still benefit of course, but to not require secondary heating, they need either something like passive annual heat storage, or natural geothermal activity such as hot springs. 

One could just check youtube: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=geothermal+home+heating
There is plenty of info there.
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