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Author Topic: Building Permits  (Read 756 times)
Guardian
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« on: December 18, 2012, 10:39:53 PM »

Q: Why should I have to obtain permission to build something on my own property?

Statist's reply: The main reason is to protect the rights of your neighbors. You need a permit to do your own electrical work because an inspector needs to check your work. If you screw up, you can set your house on fire and that is relevant to your neighbors' interests. If you want to build an extension, your neighbors are entitled to some say in how close your new walls are to theirs, how much of their view you block, etc. Your extension needs not to collapse on my house in the event that you are incompetent at construction. Also, someone else may wind up living in your house one day.


How would you counter this argument?
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MAM
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« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2012, 10:50:29 PM »

I don't need permission to do shit.
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Seth King
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« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2012, 11:23:57 PM »

Voluntary zoning vs. Forced zoning.

Under voluntary zoning, cities are organized organically, whereas under forced zoning, cities are organized through central economic planning. Instead of decisions being made in a decentralized manner, they're being made in a centralized, monopolistic manner.
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« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2012, 08:23:22 AM »

When I devalue my property by building something shitty that is exactly what happened. I devalued my property and that will reflect in any sale price for which the buyer can use that saving to restore the shitty to good, in their mind.

But what people don't seem to understand is YOU DON'T OWN THAT PROPERTY. You are renting it from the state, hence that is why they are going to have their way with it, regardless of any discussion. Research a man named Jay Noone and you will see the best example I have found of someone fighting this type of thing. He lost after several years of fending off their demands for rent payment on their property.
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BobRobertson
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« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2012, 10:24:10 AM »

Voluntary zoning happens because putting a business in the midst of a bunch of regular homes is inefficient.

Or, there actually is a demand for it, and by profiting you show that it's working.

That's why forced zoning doesn't work, there's no experimentation.
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Syock
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« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2012, 04:18:55 PM »

Voluntary zoning happens because putting a business in the midst of a bunch of regular homes is inefficient.

Or, there actually is a demand for it, and by profiting you show that it's working.

That's why forced zoning doesn't work, there's no experimentation.

I think city planners look at the world like a big game of simcity.  They think all will be better if they can force everyone to live in location A, do industrial work in location B, and put all the shops on the one road connecting them. 
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BobRobertson
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« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2012, 04:22:21 PM »

I think city planners look at the world like a big game of simcity.

Don't forget the great and important work of subsidizing the businesses they like, and crowding out the businesses they don't like.
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State-God
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« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2012, 11:09:47 PM »

Q: Why should I have to obtain permission to build something on my own property?

Statist's reply: The main reason is to protect the rights of your neighbors. You need a permit to do your own electrical work because an inspector needs to check your work. If you screw up, you can set your house on fire and that is relevant to your neighbors' interests. If you want to build an extension, your neighbors are entitled to some say in how close your new walls are to theirs, how much of their view you block, etc. Your extension needs not to collapse on my house in the event that you are incompetent at construction. Also, someone else may wind up living in your house one day.


How would you counter this argument?

Hm...it somewhat varies on the situation. If my house collapses on yours, then I can sue your ass, which I think is a pretty strong incentive to be at least somewhat careful with your building. Fires, too, may be subject to lawsuits if an investigation shows that the fire spreading to your neighbors house was partially your fault.

In terms of general situation, I suppose insurance companies would be the best incentive, especially liability insurance. In short, if you had high risk of being sued because you didn't follow good building standards your premium would be much higher.

And there also is just general reputation. If, for example, you decided to build a large blocky building that's barely an inch from your property line, it's unlikely that if you tried to move people would be willing to sell land to you.

That's all I can think of aside from the fact that it's our natural right.
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Syock
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« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2012, 02:15:23 PM »

Q: Why should I have to obtain permission to build something on my own property?

Statist's reply: The main reason is to protect the rights of your neighbors. You need a permit to do your own electrical work because an inspector needs to check your work. If you screw up, you can set your house on fire and that is relevant to your neighbors' interests. If you want to build an extension, your neighbors are entitled to some say in how close your new walls are to theirs, how much of their view you block, etc. Your extension needs not to collapse on my house in the event that you are incompetent at construction. Also, someone else may wind up living in your house one day.


How would you counter this argument?

How would I counter this argument?

Have you been to a city?   
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« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2012, 10:53:56 PM »

Q: Why should I have to obtain permission to build something on my own property?

Statist's reply: The main reason is to protect the rights of your neighbors. You need a permit to do your own electrical work because an inspector needs to check your work. If you screw up, you can set your house on fire and that is relevant to your neighbors' interests. If you want to build an extension, your neighbors are entitled to some say in how close your new walls are to theirs, how much of their view you block, etc. Your extension needs not to collapse on my house in the event that you are incompetent at construction. Also, someone else may wind up living in your house one day.


How would you counter this argument?

How would I counter this argument?

Have you been to a city?   

"Hey, let's give dictatorial rights of deciding where certain types of building can be built and to what standard to a group of people with no experience in construction, construction management, business, economics, who have a dislike for poor minorities and are also easy to bribe!"

"Yeah! What could possibly go wrong!"
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« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2013, 12:41:06 PM »

Q: Why should I have to obtain permission to build something on my own property?

Statist's reply: The main reason is to protect the rights of your neighbors. You need a permit to do your own electrical work because an inspector needs to check your work. If you screw up, you can set your house on fire and that is relevant to your neighbors' interests. If you want to build an extension, your neighbors are entitled to some say in how close your new walls are to theirs, how much of their view you block, etc. Your extension needs not to collapse on my house in the event that you are incompetent at construction. Also, someone else may wind up living in your house one day.


How would you counter this argument?

What does getting a permit from the city prove?  That you paid them money and that they think it's okay to modify your property.  How do you know that the people that work for the city and grant you the permit know what they're talking about?  How do you know the city's regulations really are for the best, and aren't too lax or too restrictive? What if the city's goals are in conflict with your own goals for your property? 

If the concern is really about safety and protecting rights, the city needs to prove to me that they can actually do the job, and that their requirements actually achieve those alleged goals--I don't need to prove to them that I know what I'm doing when it comes to my own property.
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