Better To Take Welfare Than Pay Taxes

January 9th, 2011   Submitted by Seth King

A couple of years ago I had to visit the emergency room which resulted in me being administered an IV, some muscle relaxants, a 7up, and a three thousand dollar bill. The previous summer I had finished reading American Health Care which helped me to fully understand just how F.U.B.A.R. the medical system really is in this country. At the time, I knew that the bill reflected not only the costs I had accrued, but those of many other patients as well.

I had given up on insurance long before, partly out of an inability to pay, and partly because modern insurance no longer amounts to a hedge against risk, but instead a pseudo welfare scheme. I had no money to pay the bill and considered going to the County. But because I was a limited-government libertarian, the thought of having taxpayers foot the bill for my healthcare seemed repulsive. Instead, I chose to borrow the money from my parents despite having been a perfect candidate for welfare; jobless and without assets. If I could do it over today I would have chosen welfare. Let me explain why.

If one visits nearly any major emergency room in America they will have no problem spotting dozens of individuals undoubtedly receiving healthcare they cannot afford. The bills for these individuals are picked up by taxpayers and other patients who pay for both their own costs as well as those of the welfare class. Surely, the limited time, care, and medication I received could not have had a true cost of three thousand dollars. I had likely paid over two thousand dollars of that bill in inflated costs to counterbalance the losses hospitals incur by treating those that do not pay.

Therefore, I was presented with a choice: I could either join the parasite class or I could be the chump who foots the bill for the parasite class. Being the chump that I was I foot the bill. And I say I was a chump because at the time I was still a limited-government libertarian. I still believed the system could be reformed. As a minarchist I was constantly striving for balanced budgets and the hope that someday we would legislatively repeal the welfare, warfare, and police state.

As a converted anarchist I now recognize the fact that none of that is ever going to happen. I recognize now that every tax dollar I pay only goes to support an illegitimate and dying system. The very people I used to loathe for receiving hand-outs are actually smarter than I ever was, for they are helping to bankrupt the system far more efficiently than I ever could by proselytizing my family, friends and neighbors.

No, I think I won’t be looking for a white-market job whereby I work half of the year to pay taxes. Rather, I’ll continue to work in the black and grey markets, and shop there when I can. If I am unable to make ends meet, then I say bring on the food stamps. If I go to the emergency room again, I’ll have the County pay for it. And then I’m going to rub it in the noses of those who work half the year paying taxes by reminding them that this is their system. If they don’t like it, they can always pull a John Galt and let the whole system come crashing down. Of course, there are those who pay taxes without taking any ownership of the state. But even then, as anarchists they should be spending every waking moment figuring out how to no longer be a tax slave. And if they don’t then they truly have accepted the mentality of the surrendered.

Better to not own anything of value that can be stolen, like a house or fancy cars. Better yet to bury your savings in the form of gold and silver. And best to mulct the system for every penny you can. Only then will the productive class begin to realize that paying taxes is for chumps.

However, there are some things to always keep in mind. No matter how much money the criminal gang gives you, you are not deserving of it. You are not entitled to it. It is not your right. But lastly, you are not responsible for its theft because you never condone forced wealth redistribution. That crime has been committed by the state. How it spends its stolen loot is a moot point.

14 Responses to “Better To Take Welfare Than Pay Taxes”

  1. Seth KingNo Gravatar says:

    For the record I really like that cartoon I have displayed but couldn’t bring myself to pay $90 for “permission” to repost it on my website. Nor could I justify living in fear and putting some other picture up in its stead. I guess we’ll be hearing from Righthaven soon.

    To be sure, if they come after me they’ll be spending money on litigation to attack a person who has no wealth, and who will pull a wikileaks on them if they try to shut my site down.

  2. augustNo Gravatar says:

    If someone breaks into your house and steals your property, what right do you have to retrieve it? It seems like anything you do other than using violence should be acceptable.

    Considering how much of everyone’s wealth has been stolen by the state (from taxes to the economic collapse), I think that everyone is justified in getting whatever money they can back by any means.

    Whether it’s: not paying taxes, being on welfare, operating in the black market, sending your kids to public school, driving on the welfare roads, filing bankruptcy, forming a LLC to receive special tax/legal privileges, or being a defense contractor. The blame should not be aimed at the players of the game but at the structure of the game.

    Everyone is on one form or another of state welfare, that’s the way they want it. If we are tethered to the state we are much less likely to challenge them in any way.

  3. C. Rakish SpagalettoNo Gravatar says:

    Where can i get ideas of obtaining black/grey market jobs?

  4. a chumpNo Gravatar says:

    So when the state steals from others, it’s an abomination. But when you steal from others, it’s noble?

    It’s one thing to not participate in a system that you feel is illegitimate. It’s another thing to profit from that system without contributing to it.

  5. Seth KingNo Gravatar says:

    Your avatar is perfect for your comment. Ha!

    I can understand your frustration. Since you happen to be a statist, you are taking ownership of its actions. If you do not like the fact that people are leeching off of your system without contributing to it, why don’t you change your system?

  6. AndrewNo Gravatar says:

    @Chump

    I did not infer from Seth’s article that he regards his new willingness to access the welfare system as “noble.” Nor did I infer that he would commit fraud to do so. I inferred only that he would guiltlessly apply for any and all “benefits” which the system’s own rules would permit him, given his demonstrable circumstances.

    @Seth

    “And then I’m going to rub it in the noses of those who work half the year paying taxes by reminding them that this is their system. If they don’t like it, they can always pull a John Galt and let the whole system come crashing down.If they don’t like it, they can always pull a John Galt and let the whole system come crashing down.”

    Ayn Rand’s John Galt and his compatriots sequestered themselves in a hidden Shangrhi-La-like valley deep in the Colorado Rockies, forming their own free-market economy, severing all ties to the larger system, and accepting nothing from it. The tact you would undertake is different from the Galt model, is it not? Correct me if I am mistaken.

    “But lastly, you are not responsible for its theft because you never condone forced wealth redistribution. That crime has been committed by the state. How it spends its stolen loot is a moot point.”

    I agree that you cannot be held accountable for the theft. I also acknowledge the practical reality that no one can totally escape having to use government goods and services to a greater or lesser extent, depending on our personal resources. We do what we must in order to survive and live. I make no ethical judgment on this issue.

    I would further agree that once the state has committed its armed robbery, how it spends the loot is beyond my control and therefore moot. However, if I proactively seek to acquire some of that ill-gotten loot, should I not at least consider the implications of my actions? As a long-time plodding and slow-minded student of Buddhist thought, I would wonder about the subtler effects of my intercourse with the dragon.

    First, would my petition for some of its loot lure me yet further into the its lair in some unanticipated way, perhaps entangling me into deeper dependency and lassitude? Even if my motivation were to accelerate the dragon’s demise, how long would I remain uncorrupted by the advantages of its largess?

    How much of my limited time and energy can I afford filling out stupid forms, sacrificing privacy, interacting with petty tyrants, and constantly grappling with bureaucratic consciousness?

    Would my self-interest be better served by devoting, as you say, “every waking moment figuring out how to no longer be a tax slave.”

    If I were concerned about karmic balance, how would I ascertain exactly how much of what I took back was equivalent in value to what was taken from me?

    Influenced as I also am by Aleksander Solzhenitsyn and sensing some of my own shortcomings, I have been endeavoring to minimize all interaction with state functionaries to the extent I can, even if that means I recover nothing of what was mine. I want no part in its karma. My ultimate objective while on this plane is neither to feed nor to be fed by the dragon.

    Anyway, Seth, thank you for your thought-provoking article.

    • Seth KingNo Gravatar says:

      I’ve never actively worked towards receiving a welfare check in my life. However, anytime I use the post-office or highway system I am essentially getting subsidized services by the government who got its loot from stealing from the productive class.

      It’s impossible for anyone to balance how much they put in from what they take out. But given the choice to be someone who puts in more or takes out more, I have to opt with taking out more.

      The chump wants his men with guns to steal from me, and others, but doesn’t like it when others repossess the stolen loot.

  7. the chumpNo Gravatar says:

    very much like your comment, Andrew. If I ever get swayed to share the opinions espoused by the people here, it’ll be by open-minded, rational arguments like that.
    Actually, most people seem to be quite rational in this movement. Yet, I remain a statist…

  8. JustSayNoToStatismNo Gravatar says:

    a chump: “So when the state steals from others, it’s an abomination. But when you steal from others, it’s noble?”

    I don’t think it’s noble, but it’s kind of like when “V” steals the bacon in “V for Vendetta.” You don’t really consider him to be a criminal, because he stole it from the state. And for Seth’s case, the state didn’t get what it wanted in return, which was his loyalty. So he has in effect, stolen from the state. He did not make an exchange.

    Seth: “Your avatar is perfect for your comment.”

    Speaking of avatars, how do I change mine so it isn’t an angry, drunken benzene ring?

    Andrew: “First, would my petition for some of its loot lure me yet further into the its lair in some unanticipated way, perhaps entangling me into deeper dependency and lassitude? Even if my motivation were to accelerate the dragon’s demise, how long would I remain uncorrupted by the advantages of its largess?”

    This is great. It’s something to keep in mind. If you let them take back any loyalty, then they’ve won. Be careful!

    a chump: “If I ever get swayed to share the opinions espoused by the people here, it’ll be by open-minded, rational arguments like that.”

    Get on the forum!!! I get into rational debates all the time. I could stand to do more of it online as well.

    Also, Seth nailed it by suggesting Stefan Molyneux. He’s the best resource for libertarians that are exploring the “edge” of politics and are open to reason. Consider his Youtube videos if you don’t like the website much. Search for “stefbot.” My favorite videos are:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igbBItLemsM
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLCEXtpTNYU

    but there are hours upon hours of QUALITY material to explore.

    • JustSayNoToStatismNo Gravatar says:

      Oh sorry, my avatar has always been the benzene ring, now I’m not.. hmm, I guess it’s random.

      • Seth KingNo Gravatar says:

        It’s not random. It creates a new image for every email address. You must have put in a different email address to have gotten a new avatar.

        Also, those videos you linked to were also posted in the forum. No need to send them to youtube. =)